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Why does God exist? How have the three dominant monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—shaped and altered the conception of God? How have these religions influenced each other? In this stunningly intelligent book, Karen Armstrong, one of Britain''s foremost commentators on religious affairs, traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. 

The epic story begins with the Jews'' gradual transformation of pagan idol worship in Babylon into true monotheism—a concept previously unknown in the world. Christianity and Islam both rose on the foundation of this revolutionary idea, but these religions refashioned ''the One God'' to suit the social and political needs of their followers. From classical philosophy and medieval mysticism to the Reformation, Karen Armstrong performs the near miracle of distilling the intellectual history of monotheism into one superbly readable volume, destined to take its place as a classic.

Praise for History of God

“An admirable and impressive work of synthesis that will give insight and satisfaction to thousands of lay readers.” —The Washington Post Book World

“A brilliantly lucid, spendidly readable book. [Karen] Armstrong has a dazzling ability: she can take a long and complex subject and reduce it to the fundamentals, without oversimplifying.” The Sunday Times (London)

“Absorbing . . . A lode of learning.” Time

“The most fascinating and learned study of the biggest wild goose chase in history—the quest for God. Karen Armstrong is a genius.” —A.N. Wilson, author of Jesus: A Life

Amazon.com Review

Armstrong, a British journalist and former nun, guides us along one of the most elusive and fascinating quests of all time--the search for God. Like all beloved historians, Armstrong entertains us with deft storytelling, astounding research, and makes us feel a greater appreciation for the present because we better understand our past. Be warned: A History of God is not a tidy linear history. Rather, we learn that the definition of God is constantly being repeated, altered, discarded, and resurrected through the ages, responding to its followers'' practical concerns rather than to mystical mandates. Armstrong also shows us how Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have overlapped and influenced one another, gently challenging the secularist history of each of these religions. --Gail Hudson

Review

“An admirable and impressive work of synthesis that will give insight and satisfaction to thousands of lay readers.” —The Washington Post Book World

“A brilliantly lucid, spendidly readable book. [Karen] Armstrong has a dazzling ability: she can take a long and complex subject and reduce it to the fundamentals, without oversimplifying.” The Sunday Times (London)

“Absorbing . . . A lode of learning.” Time

“The most fascinating and learned study of the biggest wild goose chase in history—the quest for God. Karen Armstrong is a genius.” —A.N. Wilson, author of Jesus: A Life

From the Back Cover

"An admirable and impressive work of synthesis that will give insight and satisfaction to thousands of lay readers."
THE WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD
In this stunningly intelligent book, Karen Armstrong, one of Britain''s foremost commentators on religious affairs, traces the history of how men and women have perceived and experienced God, from the time of Abraham to the present. From classical philsophy and medieval mysticism to the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and the modern age of skepticism, Karen Armstrong performs the near miracle of distilling the intellectual history of monotheism into one superbly readable volume, destined to take its place as a classic.

About the Author

Karen Armstrong is the author of numerous books on religion, including  The  Case for God, A History of God, The Battle for God, Holy War, Islam, Buddha, and  Fields of Blood, as well as a memoir,  The Spiral Staircase. Her work has been translated into 45 languages. In 2008 she was awarded the TED Prize and began working with TED on the Charter for Compassion, created online by the general public, crafted by leading thinkers in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. It was launched globally in the fall of 2009. Also in 2008, she was awarded the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Medal. In 2013, she received the British Academy’s inaugural Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Transcultural Understanding.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

In the Beginning …

 
IN THE BEGINNING, human beings created a God who was the First Cause of all things and Ruler of heaven and earth. He was not represented by images and had no temple or priests in his service. He was too exalted for an inadequate human cult. Gradually he faded from the consciousness of his people. He had become so remote that they decided that they did not want him anymore. Eventually he was said to have disappeared.
 
That, at least, is one theory, popularized by Father Wilhelm Schmidt in The Origin of the Idea of God, first published in 1912. Schmidt suggested that there had been a primitive monotheism before men and women had started to worship a number of gods. Originally they had acknowledged only one Supreme Deity, who had created the world and governed human affairs from afar. Belief in such a High God (sometimes called the Sky God, since he is associated with the heavens) is still a feature of the religious life in many indigenous African tribes. They yearn toward God in prayer; believe that he is watching over them and will punish wrongdoing. Yet he is strangely absent from their daily lives: he has no special cult and is never depicted in effigy. The tribesmen say that he is inexpressible and cannot be contaminated by the world of men. Some people say that he has “gone away.” Anthropologists suggest that this God has become so distant and exalted that he has in effect been replaced by lesser spirits and more accessible gods. So too, Schmidt’s theory goes, in ancient times, the High God was replaced by the more attractive gods of the pagan pantheons. In the beginning, therefore, there was One God. If this is so, then monotheism was one of the earliest ideas evolved by human beings to explain the mystery and tragedy of life. It also indicates some of the problems that such a deity might have to face.
 
It is impossible to prove this one way or the other. There have been many theories about the origin of religion. Yet it seems that creating gods is something that human beings have always done. When one religious idea ceases to work for them, it is simply replaced. These ideas disappear quietly, like the Sky God, with no great fanfare. In our own day, many people would say that the God worshipped for centuries by Jews, Christians and Muslims has become as remote as the Sky God. Some have actually claimed that he has died. Certainly he seems to be disappearing from the lives of an increasing number of people, especially in Western Europe. They speak of a “God-shaped hole” in their consciousness where he used to be, because, irrelevant though he may seem in certain quarters, he has played a crucial role in our history and has been one of the greatest human ideas of all time. To understand what we are losing—if, that is, he really is disappearing—we need to see what people were doing when they began to worship this God, what he meant and how he was conceived. To do that we need to go back to the ancient world of the Middle East, where the idea of our God gradually emerged about 14,000 years ago.
 
One of the reasons why religion seems irrelevant today is that many of us no longer have the sense that we are surrounded by the unseen. Our scientific culture educates us to focus our attention on the physical and material world in front of us. This method of looking at the world has achieved great results. One of its consequences, however, is that we have, as it were, edited out the sense of the “spiritual” or the “holy” which pervades the lives of people in more traditional societies at every level and which was once an essential component of our human experience of the world. In the South Sea Islands, they call this mysterious force mana; others experience it as a presence or spirit; sometimes it has been felt as an impersonal power, like a form of radioactivity or electricity. It was believed to reside in the tribal chief, in plants, rocks or animals. The Latins experienced numina (spirits) in sacred groves; Arabs felt that the landscape was populated by the jinn. Naturally people wanted to get in touch with this reality and make it work for them, but they also simply wanted to admire it. When they personalized the unseen forces and made them gods, associated with the wind, sun, sea and stars but possessing human characteristics, they were expressing their sense of affinity with the unseen and with the world around them.
 
Rudolf Otto, the German historian of religion who published his important book The Idea of the Holy in 1917, believed that this sense of the “numinous” was basic to religion. It preceded any desire to explain the origin of the world or find a basis for ethical behavior. The numinous power was sensed by human beings in different ways—sometimes it inspired wild, bacchanalian excitement; sometimes a deep calm; sometimes people felt dread, awe and humility in the presence of the mysterious force inherent in every aspect of life. When people began to devise their myths and worship their gods, they were not seeking a literal explanation for natural phenomena. The symbolic stories, cave paintings and carvings were an attempt to express their wonder and to link this pervasive mystery with their own lives; indeed, poets, artists and musicians are often impelled by a similar desire today. In the Palaeolithic period, for example, when agriculture was developing, the cult of the Mother Goddess expressed a sense that the fertility which was transforming human life was actually sacred. Artists carved those statues depicting her as a naked, pregnant woman which archaeologists have found all over Europe, the Middle East and India. The Great Mother remained imaginatively important for centuries. Like the old Sky God, she was absorbed into later pantheons and took her place alongside the older deities. She was usually one of the most powerful of the gods, certainly more powerful than the Sky God, who remained a rather shadowy figure. She was called Inana in ancient Sumeria, Ishtar in Babylon, Anat in Canaan, Isis in Egypt and Aphrodite in Greece, and remarkably similar stories were devised in all these cultures to express her role in the spiritual lives of the people. These myths were not intended to be taken literally, but were metaphorical attempts to describe a reality that was too complex and elusive to express in any other way. These dramatic and evocative stories of gods and goddesses helped people to articulate their sense of the powerful but unseen forces that surrounded them.
 
Indeed, it seems that in the ancient world people believed that it was only by participating in this divine life that they would become truly human. Earthly life was obviously fragile and overshadowed by mortality, but if men and women imitated the actions of the gods they would share to some degree their greater power and effectiveness. Thus it was said that the gods had shown men how to build their cities and temples, which were mere copies of their own homes in the divine realm. The sacred world of the gods—as recounted in myth—was not just an ideal toward which men and women should aspire, but was the prototype of human existence; it was the original pattern or the archetype on which our life here below had been modeled. Everything on earth was thus believed to be a replica of something in the divine world, a perception that informed the mythology, ritual and social organization of most of the cultures of antiquity and continues to influence more traditional societies in our own day.1 In ancient Iran, for example, every single person or object in the mundane world (getik) was held to have its counterpart in the archetypal world of sacred reality (menok). This is a perspective that is difficult for us to appreciate in the modern world, since we see autonomy and independence as supreme human values. Yet the famous tag post coitum omne animal tristis est still expresses a common experience: after an intense and eagerly anticipated moment, we often feel that we have missed something greater that remains just beyond our grasp. The imitation of a god is still an important religious notion: resting on the Sabbath or washing somebody’s feet on Maundy Thursday—actions that are meaningless in themselves—are now significant and sacred because people believe that they were once performed by God.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
966 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Josey Lyons
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Written from Christian Perspective, not Objective.
Reviewed in the United States on July 29, 2020
I was hoping to read this book for an objective perspective on the development of Judaism from polytheism to henotheism to monotheism. Within the first chapter, by page 15 there had been multiple references of I presume Yhwh being referred to as "Our Creator God"... See more
I was hoping to read this book for an objective perspective on the development of Judaism from polytheism to henotheism to monotheism.

Within the first chapter, by page 15 there had been multiple references of I presume Yhwh being referred to as "Our Creator God" and "Our God."

I only read the first chapter before deciding to return it. Within the first chapter, there wasn''t any clarification to which god she was referring to by saying "God" and even "Our God." That''s incredibly vague and frankly inappropriate for a book about objective truth. I have no interest in learning about whom Karen Armstrong thinks is her god, but rather the development of Judaism from polytheism mixed with Babylonian myths into Judeo-Christian mythology.

I do not recommend reading this book if you are looking for an objective perspective, as Karen Armstrong wrote this from a mystical christian perspective.
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Frodo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Her writing style is by far the best. Previous attempts at reading other authors discussing this ...
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2018
This was the first book that I had read by this author. I was so impressed with the way she presented the historical data that I found myself--for the first time--actually understanding the major religions of the world. Her writing style is by far the best. Previous... See more
This was the first book that I had read by this author. I was so impressed with the way she presented the historical data that I found myself--for the first time--actually understanding the major religions of the world. Her writing style is by far the best. Previous attempts at reading other authors discussing this subject were dry, complicated and frankly left me with absolutely no desire to pursue reading about the history of the different religions. Because of all the chaos and fighting amongst those of different religions of the world, I thought that I should still try to understand the religious background information and be able to discuss, with some intellect, the issues facing the problems in this country and in the East. I now feel that I can discuss some of the issues---ever since reading this book. I have also read Karen Armstrong''s "In the Beginning," which I also feel was very well written. Karen Armstrong comes across as a very knowledgeable individual in the field of world religions and with her writing style, she can help people like me to better understand this subject.
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David
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The transformation of GOD
Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2018
First few this book was a difficult book to read because of its extremely long chapters. There was so much information to digest that you lost the meaning and understanding of what you were reading half way through the chapters. It would have been better to make smaller... See more
First few this book was a difficult book to read because of its extremely long chapters. There was so much information to digest that you lost the meaning and understanding of what you were reading half way through the chapters. It would have been better to make smaller chapters so you had time to digest what was being said.

Now, as far as the book is concerned, i enjoyed it. It was enlightening, informative, and awakening especially to someone like me who is on a quest to find out if religion or God has a place in my life!

I have always believed that religion is man made as well as its rules and laws to control, manipulate, and intimidate us! This book has reinforced this idea as there are hundreds of religious variations of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

I was raised an Orthodox Jew and have alway questioned and searched for my own understanding and I will continue to search for “my”truth!
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Francis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great read
Reviewed in the United States on March 4, 2017
For me, this book is a slow read, not because it is not well written (in fact, it is beautifully written), but because I find myself stopping after several pages, thinking about what I have just read, going back for a re-read, comparing that to what I read a few days ago,... See more
For me, this book is a slow read, not because it is not well written (in fact, it is beautifully written), but because I find myself stopping after several pages, thinking about what I have just read, going back for a re-read, comparing that to what I read a few days ago, making a margin note, and so on. In other words, for me this book is an experience. If you have a genuine interest in the world''s spiritual traditions, a willingness to be flexible as regards what you think you already know about them, and the time to grow, you will almost certainly like this book.I love it.
54 people found this helpful
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Linda Larson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Comprehensive
Reviewed in the United States on January 14, 2017
Not for the light reader, or those who have made up their mind. But, if you want to understand how religious leaders, theologians, or philosophers have understood God across eras of society, this is a good resource. Plan to read a chapter, or section of a chapter, at a... See more
Not for the light reader, or those who have made up their mind. But, if you want to understand how religious leaders, theologians, or philosophers have understood God across eras of society, this is a good resource. Plan to read a chapter, or section of a chapter, at a time, then set it down to contemplate.
45 people found this helpful
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Mike Morgenstein
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Very Enjoyable Read!
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2016
The book is separated by 11 chapters. ~ Chapters 1-2 (In The Beginning, One God). The author begins by exploring the most primitive conceptions of the divine. She delves into the Axial Age (800 - 200 BCE) and explains the Aristotelian god, Buddhism... See more
The book is separated by 11 chapters.

~ Chapters 1-2 (In The Beginning, One God).

The author begins by exploring the most primitive conceptions of the divine. She delves into the Axial Age (800 - 200 BCE) and explains the Aristotelian god, Buddhism conceptions (Nirvana, Atman, Brahman), the old polytheistic pagan religions, and the important revelations and that have become expedient in the doctrines and worship of the major religions of the world today (Moses, Abraham, etc). Also - and perhaps most importantly - the author explains how monotheism and the praising of one god came about.

~ Chapters 3-5 (A Light to the Gentiles, Trinity: The Christian God, Unity: The God of Islam)

As you can probably expect, these chapters explore the roots of the major Abrahamic religions. It is interesting to see the trials and tribulations each one endured. You can expect to read about the evolution of ideas between the religions, how they relate to each other, and their ever-evolving conceptions of outsiders.

~ Chapters 6-8 (The God of the Philosophers, The God of the Mystics, A God for Reformers)

Perhaps the most interesting sections of the text. In these chapters, history is amalgamated with philosophy: the author explores the 3 major conceptions of God, with how they came about, and then ties them to their implications, doctrines, and perceptions. To explain each briefly: The God of the philosophers came about when God got caught up in the mix of philosophy. As civilizations started to advance, philosophers took it upon themselves to look at and try to prove the existence of God rationally. The philosopher''s God was one that can be proven through inquiry and rational thought, and one that should be liable to discourse. For some time many religious sects adopted this game plan for God, for example, the Faylasufs. The God of the Mystics was an alternative: it can not be proven through rational thought because it lay beyond experiment and observation. The God of the Mystics was one that could be felt deep inside us, and in nature, even though it''s essence itself was impenetrable. The God for Reformers is a more contemporary, personal, and rule imposing entity. This God was used to reform certain societies and their norms; it was the centerpiece for theocratic empires.

~ Chapters 9-11 (Enlightenment, The Death of God?, Does God Have a Future?)

If there''s history in any sense in these chapters, it is not the main goal of them. These chapters talk about the enlightenment era with its advent of science and technology. This was the time in history where discoveries were made that shattered preconceived conceptions of the physical world, the solar system, and most importantly our place in it. This was the time where we really started to discover that perhaps life does not have any divine meaning, and by observing natural phenomenon we come to see that there is also no purpose. For the first time, it was possible to become an Atheist. Many prominent intellectuals came to abhor the idea of a creator, or master engineer, that that twists and turns the knobs of life and discriminately favors some while punishing others. Much of the general public had severe reservations of how personal God was, and can be, just like the Mystics and the Buddhists. Is God dead? The New Right Christian movement of the late 20th century doesn''t seem to portend to any fatality of superstition. Does God Have a Future? Who knows. Apparently the author believes that the God of the Mystics does, which I discuss below.

I must concede that what is so prolific about the book is the author''s candor. In her sentiment you can detect of a whiff of fate, and thus reckon her intrapersonal disappointment in her tone, but she nevertheless casts her emotions aside to justly display the truth. Much sections of the book reads as if it was written by an atheist. But this doesn''t mean that she didn''t purvey her opinions. Often you can extrapolate her convictions on matters by the way she alludes to it and by what (I almost said ''who'', but that would have been incorrect) she chooses to quote. I''m not an expert on religious matters, but she seemed to be objective - atleast in motivation - for the most part when explicating and trying to explain God''s history. I believe that for the most part, such a goal (i.e. objectivity) is not feasible. In the history of divinity and religion; with it''s prophets and revelations; there are too many uncertainties to be able to explain these topics without a substantial amount of subjectivity. The whole religious enterprise seems to be subjective. This isn''t an existential rejoinder, but an observational truth. It''s possible for such experiences to be "real", in the non-materialist and neuron-void sense, but it is not plausible. There is admittedly not a complete material understanding of consciousness and the brain, but there is a fairly adequate scientific understanding of it that takes dominion over the archaic notions of Dualism and non-material "magic" that so many intellectuals have resorted (or succumbed) to in the past when explaining subjective experience and the human mind. It seems that the author, Karen Armstrong, doesn''t seem to understand this and I think the contemplative reader is ultimately left in the midst when trying to string together her "God", the one that would purportedly work in the future. She rejects a personal God, and denotes such an idea as unjustifiable, dangerous, and detrimental to religion. So then wouldn''t she be a deist? She speaks a lot about deism but doesn''t seem to allude to being a deist, per se. She seems to be enthralled by the God of the mystics; the one that lacks shape or form, that can''t be anthropomorphized, and is all around us; and that''s attainable through introspective practices. She doesn''t mention it, but if she doesn''t believe that this God created the universe, and is knowledgeable incorporeal entity, than what is the point of God? She seems to insinuate that you need such belief or faith because it attenuates the inner conflict of struggle and inevitable death, but this conclusion is parochial in nature and it does not deserve any kind of fidelity.
I would also like to mention, as other reviewers did before me, that she seems to paint Islam in good light. She is in no way a Muslim, but perhaps she felt propelled to be a little persuasive in tonality when speaking on behalf of Islamic religion and Koranic scripture because of prevailing vitriol and inflicted cultural subjectivity in the Western portrait of Islam. This of course was around the time the book was published (1991), and i''m sure although Islam deserves much of it, many academics nevertheless go overboard; that is, doing it fallaciously; in demonizing it. The problem is that Armstrong''s fervor shows in this aspect, and often seems to undermine and juxtapose the other major monotheistic religions which seems like an effort to bring them down just to enhance the comparative look of Islam. At one point she seems to blame the downfall of what used to be an open-minded and rationally motivated religion (i.e. Islam) on the Westernization of Islamic territory through Colonialism. This seems like a feeble attempt to deposit blame on other things while simply ignoring requisite facts of an (or at least what came to be an) inherently destructive religion. Maybe some positive light needed to be shedded, because anything that is entirely bad doesn''t last long. Even though Islam may have, or have had, some good tenets, I still remain a little skeptical of its exegesis in this text.

Note that when I say "seems that the author, Karen Armstrong, doesn''t seem to understand this...", i''m coming from my pre-conceived conviction in the fidelity of Materialism (which is what I meant by "this"). In other words, I''m assuming it to be the truth, which many people - especially readers of this book - wouldn''t adhere to. Even though I don''t necessarily agree with everything the author has to say, the text itself was engaging and I sincerely enjoyed reading it. There is a lot of information to be gleaned and I do recommend it. It deserves a high rating.

4.4/5
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JVib
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Interesting Read
Reviewed in the United States on February 19, 2020
This was an interesting read. It covers the evolution of the concepts of the god(s) of Judaism, Christianity and Islam over time and how other cultures and beliefs influenced who that (or is it those?) god(s) became what they are today. I can see how all of the information... See more
This was an interesting read. It covers the evolution of the concepts of the god(s) of Judaism, Christianity and Islam over time and how other cultures and beliefs influenced who that (or is it those?) god(s) became what they are today. I can see how all of the information ties together and makes sense. As a former Christian I often wondered how the cruel, and in many ways evil, god described in the old testament ended up transforming into the "turn the other cheek" (but still not great, as he still has the rule of "Believe in me and follow me or you will suffer for eternity") god of the new testament. I did not do any serious research on the author''s references so I can''t say with certainty all of the information provide is accurate.
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Katie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Armstrong is magical
Reviewed in the United States on December 31, 2013
My copy of this book is full of highlights, annotations, exclamation marks, and dog-eared pages. For anyone who is interested in the idea of God, Western religion tradition, and the history of how we got to where we''re at now and where it all came from... well, there could... See more
My copy of this book is full of highlights, annotations, exclamation marks, and dog-eared pages. For anyone who is interested in the idea of God, Western religion tradition, and the history of how we got to where we''re at now and where it all came from... well, there could not be a better book for it!!!!
Full of facts and sources, writing and literature, and crammed with history and information, this book is THE source for the history of the monotheist God. From pre-Judaic concepts of God in Babylon to the formation of the nation of Israel and Abraham, through the Jewish periods (Mosaic, Temple Judaism, Prophets, etc) and into Jesus of Nazareth.. then early Christianity, the formation of the Catholic church as we recognize today, and into Muhammad and the start of Islam. It gets better: Armstrong continues into depth with the God of the philosophers, the mystics and their divine wisdom, and then into the death of God and the future of God.
I bought this book for a college course titled "The Idea of God" and we used the text as a reference for our study, as it took us gently through the history of this monotheist idea of God.
One thing worth noting: It is recommended to have a search engine on hand, as Armstrong tends to assume that readers are already on top of this kind of knowledge. Sometimes it can be a little dense in the beginning, but once you get into it you may find yourself reading it for pure enjoyment and knowledge, as well as wisdom.
There is much to gain in this book and I recommend it for anyone who is Jewish, Christian, Islam, any other religion, or considers themselves spiritual. If you''re looking for the stuff you don''t learn in church, Armstrong has it all. Prepare to be amazed at all the things you never knew and have your idea of God change, for the better.
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VJ Hobart
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A VERY GOOD SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 4, 2021
This book was easy to find online: good choice of copies with condition described, reasonable price, prompt delivery, 100 % all round. Thanks from Virginia Hobart
This book was easy to find online: good choice of copies with condition described, reasonable price, prompt delivery, 100 % all round. Thanks from Virginia Hobart
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rodrigo hernandez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Profundo y bien documentado
Reviewed in Mexico on April 8, 2019
El libro se adentra no sólo en los eventos históricos que rodean el desarrollo de las 3 religiones monoteístas, también profundiza en la filosofía que precede y enmarca a estas religiones en diferentes periodos de la historia.
El libro se adentra no sólo en los eventos históricos que rodean el desarrollo de las 3 religiones monoteístas, también profundiza en la filosofía que precede y enmarca a estas religiones en diferentes periodos de la historia.
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Md Tanvir Rana
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book revealed many unknown things
Reviewed in Canada on September 27, 2020
I was very eager to know the relations among creature, creations, religion etc. After going thru this book, now, i can corelate these staffs. But to digest & to understand clearly, i have to read this book with keen attention.
I was very eager to know the relations among creature, creations, religion etc. After going thru this book, now, i can corelate these staffs. But to digest & to understand clearly, i have to read this book with keen attention.
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Wolfric
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It clearly shows the reason why Nietzsche could not find ...
Reviewed in Canada on January 16, 2016
It clearly shows the reason why Nietzsche could not find an inspirational character in our Western world and chose Zoroaster to say the words in his book "thus spoke Zarathustra (Zoroaster)". Western spiritual history lags behind all major cultures.
It clearly shows the reason why Nietzsche could not find an inspirational character in our Western world and chose Zoroaster to say the words in his book "thus spoke Zarathustra (Zoroaster)". Western spiritual history lags behind all major cultures.
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JC
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book vs quality print
Reviewed in Canada on August 13, 2018
Content is A1. Quality of the print is questionable: very small printed letters squeezed on pages (from top to bottom page). Me first impression was that it looks like a photocopied reformatted book to reduce the thickness of the volume. Great history book!
Content is A1. Quality of the print is questionable: very small printed letters squeezed on pages (from top to bottom page). Me first impression was that it looks like a photocopied reformatted book to reduce the thickness of the volume. Great history book!
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